Decorative Iron Shutters

DECORATIVE IRON SHUTTERS. GELERT CANOPY. WINDOW TREATMENTS BLINDS.

Decorative Iron Shutters

decorative iron shutters

    decorative

  • Relating to decoration
  • Serving to make something look more attractive; ornamental
  • (decorativeness) an appearance that serves to decorate and make something more attractive
  • cosmetic: serving an esthetic rather than a useful purpose; "cosmetic fenders on cars"; "the buildings were utilitarian rather than decorative"
  • (decoratively) in a decorative manner; "used decoratively at Christmas"

    shutters

  • (shutter) close with shutters; "We shuttered the window to keep the house cool"
  • Close the <em>shutters</em> of (a window or building)
  • (shutter) a hinged blind for a window
  • Close (a business)
  • (shutter) a mechanical device on a camera that opens and closes to control the time of a photographic exposure

    iron

  • Smooth (clothes, sheets, etc.) with an <em>iron</em>
  • cast-iron: extremely robust; "an iron constitution"
  • a heavy ductile magnetic metallic element; is silver-white in pure form but readily rusts; used in construction and tools and armament; plays a role in the transport of oxygen by the blood
  • press and smooth with a heated iron; "press your shirts"; "she stood there ironing"

decorative iron shutters – 3 Piece

3 Piece Decorative Solar Light Set
3 Piece Decorative Solar Light Set
This 3 piece decorative solar light set is a perfect addition to your yard and garden, and costs nothing to operate! Color-changing LED inside the transparent hummingbird, butterfly and dragonfly constantly cycles from red to green to blue once dusk falls. 1-3/4″-square solar panel hangs on each stake, and charges the built-in AA NiCd battery in direct sunlight, so once dusk comes, the light show automatically begins. ?Solar panel charges the battery during the day ?LED turns on automatically at dusk ?Changes color in a red-green-blue sequence Includes three 30″ tall stakes

327 Westervelt Avenue House

327 Westervelt Avenue House
New Brighton, Staten Island, New York City, New York, United States

Summary

The Vanderzee-Harper House is a fine surviving example of a Queen Anne style residence with Shingle style details, built c.1887 in Staten Island’s affluent “Fort Hill” section. The house features many details characteristic of the Queen Anne and Shingle styles, including a prominent three-story tower; bay window projections; bracketed, cantilevered gable projections; turned woodwork and a curved roofline at the porch; textured shingle and clapboard siding; a variety of window types and shapes, including multi-light upper sash and stained-glass windows; and a tall, decorative masonry chimney.

The house was constructed c.1887 for Margaret A. Shields (later Vanderzee) who had recently purchased the property from Charles A. Herpich. A Manhattan furrier and prominent Staten Island resident, Herpich had substantial real estate holdings in the area, including his large home nearby at the corner of Westervelt and Hendricks avenues.

Having purchased the property in 1887, Margaret A. Vanderzee retained ownership until 1920, although she and her husband had relocated to Philadelphia by 1895. After occupancy by several renters, the home was owned for over twenty-five years by the family of Thomas Harper, a grocery store owner who was active in local civic affairs. The house has recently been restored and many of its historic decorative features remain intact.

DESCRIPTION AND ANALYSIS

The Site

The Vanderzee-Harper House is located on Fort Hill in northeastern Staten Island at the edges of the villages of Tompkinsville, New Brighton and St. George. Considered the oldest European village in eastern Staten Island, Tompkinsville was known in colonial times as the Watering Place for a fresh water spring located there. According to Holden’s Staten Island, The History of Richmond County, Giovanni da Verrazzano, who is credited with “discovering” the island in 1524, was led “to safe anchorage near ‘The Watering Place’” by resident “friendly LeniLenapes.” Evidence of earlier inhabitation by Native Americans during the Woodland period has also been found in the surrounding area, including traces of campsites, Native American artifacts and “triangular points.” In 1639, several families sent by Captain David Pietersz De Vries, who was the second patroon to receive a land grant on Staten Island from the Dutch West India Company, settled near the Watering Place. According to research done by former Staten Island Borough Historian Dick Dickenson, there is evidence that these colonists may have owned African slaves, the first living on Staten Island. The colony did not survive past 1641.

Residential development of this section of Staten Island was first promoted by Daniel D. Tompkins. A governor of New York and later vice president of the United States, Tompkins (1774-1825) spent considerable time on Staten Island during the War of 1812. Impressed by the island’s natural beauty and the ease of travel to Manhattan, in October 1816, Tompkins commissioned a survey of a portion of his recently purchased land to be developed as the village of Tompkinsville. Realizing that transportation would significantly aid development, he procured the incorporation of the Richmond Turnpike Company to establish a highway from the New Blazing Star Ferry on the west shore of Staten Island to Tompkinsville along the route of present-day Victory Boulevard. He also acquired an interest in the steamboat monopoly of Fulton and Livingston and the following year established regular ferry service between Staten Island and Whitehall Street in New York City. In 1817, Tompkins, in his last year as governor of New York, signed the “Final Abolition Act” that freed all slaves living in the state by 1827. (Although a known abolitionist, the 1800 U. S. Census lists Daniel D. Tompkins living in the 1st Ward in New York City as having one enslaved person in his household.) Tompkins borrowed heavily to finance his enterprises in Staten Island, expecting to be reimbursed for expenses he had incurred on behalf of the government during the War of 1812. Stalled repayments brought about foreclosure proceedings on the land, and following his death in 1825 other creditors brought suit against his estate. Several of his children and his nephew, Caleb T. Ward, some of whom were in part responsible for the early development of the adjacent village of Stapleton, purchased portions of his former holdings at auction in the late 1820s and early 1830s.

In 1830, Dr. John S. Westervelt (1799-1869), the first health officer of the port of New York, who had married Daniel Tompkins’ daughter Hannah, purchased a ninety-eight acre tract that formerly had been part of her father’s estate. The Westervelts moved into Tompkins’ house (demolished) on Fort Hill near the present-day intersection of Fort Place and Sherman Avenue. To provide access to this property from Richmond Terrace and the dock at the foot of

The Vanderzee-Harper House

The Vanderzee-Harper House
Westervelt Avenue, St. George, Staten Island

The Vanderzee-Harper House is a fine surviving example of a Queen Anne style residence with Shingle style details, built c.1887 in Staten Island’s affluent “Fort Hill” section. The house features many details characteristic of the Queen Anne and Shingle styles, including a prominent three story tower; bay window projections; bracketed, cantilevered gable projections; turned woodwork and a curved roofline at the porch; textured shingle and clapboard siding; a variety of window types and shapes, including multi-light upper sash and stained-glass windows; and a tall, decorative masonry chimney.

The house was constructed c.1887 for Margaret A. Shields (later Vanderzee) who had recently purchased the property from Charles A. Herpich. A Manhattan furrier and prominent Staten Island resident, Herpich had substantial real estate holdings in the area, including his large home nearby at the corner of Westervelt and Hendricks avenues.

Having purchased the property in 1887, Margaret A. Vanderzee retained ownership until 1920, although she and her husband had relocated to Philadelphia by 1895. After occupancy by several renters, the home was owned for over twenty-five years by the family of Thomas Harper, a grocery store owner who was active in local civic affairs. The house has recently been restored and many of its historic decorative features remain intact.

The Vanderzee-Harper House is located on a rectangular lot that has a frontage of 50 feet along Westervelt Avenue and is approximately 89 feet deep. The house sits just forward of the center of the lot, behind a simple iron railing with historic iron posts.29 A concrete-paved path leads from the sidewalk through a decorative iron gate set between two, non-historic brick piers to the front door. The path is flanked by gardens and several low, curvilinear bluestone planting beds. Located on Fort Hill, the site slopes down toward the south (side) and east (rear of the building). There is a concrete paved sidewalk along the northern side of the house, and a less structured path of bluestone pavers, gravel and brick, as well as numerous plantings along the southern side of the house, leading to the well-planted rear yard.

Set on brick foundation, the two-and-a-half-story building, divided into five bays at the first floor and two bays at the upper stories, is dominated by a three-story round and polygonal tower at the front facade. The facade features pale-green painted clapboard siding with olivegreen corner boards at the first floor and natural-wood or brown-painted shingles of different shapes at the second and third stories. The large, one-story porch at the northern half of the front facade partially wraps around the north-side facade and features projecting gable and curved rooflines, extending from the second floor tower. The porch is supported by simplified, turned wood posts, painted brown and olive green, set on an olive-green, square-post railing with light green square balusters.30 Brown-painted rectangular wood shingles, set at alternating levels, fill the gable while unpainted wood shingles cover both porch roofs. The porch features a brown painted wood floor and unpainted bead board ceiling with a light fixture and several planters suspended from it.

The first bay of the first floor has a rectangular, single-pane fixed window with a storm window and the numbers “327” above. The paneled wood and glass door is located in the second bay, and features a brown-painted wooden storm door and simple, olive-green painted surround. The next three openings comprise a bay window of multi-light-over-one, double-hung wood windows with simple wood surrounds and storm windows. There is a small, rectangular basement window located below the fourth bay. The second floor of the front facade is divided into two bays and features scalloped and rectangular wood shingles. The rounded section of the tower projects from the facade in the first bay and features a tripartite window composed of three, multi-light-over-one, double-hung wood windows with simple wood surrounds and wood storm windows. The second bay of the second floor also contains a tripartite window, however, it features three rectangular, stained-glass windows set above a single, multilight over-one, double-hung wood window with olive-green painted wood shutters, all with storm windows. The natural-wood-shingle-clad tower extends above the roofline at the third story with a polygonal shape, three, multi-light-over-one, double-hung wood windows with simple wood surrounds and wood storm windows, and an asphalt-shingled, bell roof. Side walls and a gable roof extend from the sides of the tower, intersecting with the slope of the eaves-front, asphalt shingled main roof. A small, gable-front dormer, with natural-wood shingle cladding and a single, multi-light-over-one, double-hung wood window with simple wood surround, extends above the southern side of the roof. The d

decorative iron shutters

The Big Book of Decorative Painting: How to Paint If You Don't Know How and How to Improve If You Do
This volume clearly and thoroughly explains the methods of adorning objects with stylized flowers, fruit, scrolls, and other organic designs. After a full explanation of the preliminaries (color mixing, brush control, basic strokes, surface preparation), Jackie Shaw walks you step by step through all manner of decorative painting motifs, from the simplest comma-stroke leaf to the most elaborate floral sprays. Each motif is covered in three skill levels, which can be mixed and matched; a beginner, for example, can utilize the easy techniques on advanced-level patterns. Projects are many and varied and include wood, tinware, and glass objects. The Big Book of Decorative Painting is a marvelous introduction to the techniques, and accomplished painters will also find much information that is of use.

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